On October 3, 2018, California U.S. District Judge Edward Chen granted a preliminary injunction in the case of Ramos v. Nielsen, preventing the Department of Homeland Security from terminating Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador (scheduled to end on 9/9/19), Haiti (7/22/19), Nicaragua (1/5/19), and Sudan (11/2/18).  The injunction remains in place until the Court lifts it or the lawsuit ends. Continue Reading California Court Temporarily Enjoins Administration from Ending Temporary Protected Status; Other TPS Lawsuits Proceed

Earlier this year, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it will terminate the temporary protected status (TPS) program for nationals of El Salvador on September 9, 2019.  Employment authorization documents (EADs) held by qualifying individuals that expired on March 9, 2018, were automatically extended through September 5, 2018, providing applicants time to apply for new EADs valid through the termination date.

Because the USCIS has been unable to process EAD extension applications in a timely manner, DHS has further extended the expired EADs through March 4, 2019, provided that:

  • The EAD has a marked expiration date of March 9, 2018, and the individual applied for a new EAD after January 18, 2018; or
  • The EAD has a marked expiration date of September 9, 2016, and the individual applied for a new EAD on or after July 8, 2016.

USCIS states that it will mail a Notice of Continued Evidence of Work Authorization to eligible individuals to present to their employers for I-9 verification purposes.  Those who have not received their notices by September 4, 2018, must contact USCIS at (202) 272-8377.  In the interim, nationals of El Salvador can show employers the USCIS web page to continue working lawfully while awaiting their letters.  The web page can be found at this link.

The New York Times features Suzan Kern in an interview with María, a woman who was sexually assaulted by a Corrections Corporation of America guard while under the custody of ICE, following her release on bond from the Hutto detention center in Texas. CCA violated the terms of its contract with ICE, which mandated that female detainees be transferred with at least one female guard. Instead, CCA’s male guard, Donald Dunn, who assaulted María, transported women alone 77 times in less than a year. “When he let her out of the van at the Austin airport, she ran,” Suzan, María’s pro bono immigration attorney, says in the video. “The guard there at the airport asked her what was wrong and she immediately told him what had happened.” María courageously explains, “I think this happened not only to me but to several people.” Eight women came forward to testify against Dunn, who was convicted and served prison time. Suzan, who also represents another of Dunn’s victims pro bono, believes there were even more, “because these were the women who could be tracked down and who were willing to speak.”

The full article can be found here (for the best viewing experience, please copy and paste the article link into Google Chrome).

In a closely watched asylum appeal, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has issued a decision that will adversely affect the ability of victims of domestic and gang violence to find protection in the United States.

Matter of A-B- was originally decided, in December 2016, in favor of the asylum seeker by the Board of Immigration Appeals.  The BIA is an administrative branch of the US Department of Justice.  It accepts appeals, filed by either government attorneys or immigrants, of decisions made by civil immigration courts throughout the country.

In late 2016, the BIA overturned the 2015 denial of A-B-‘s asylum claim by a judge in Charlotte, North Carolina, where asylum was denied at a rate of 72 to 84.5 per cent between 2011 and 2016.  Finding the denial was “clearly erreoneous,” the BIA said A-B- had proven she was persecuted based on membership in a “particular social group”; specifically, “El Salvadoran women who are unable to leave their domestic relationships where they have children in common.”

In March 2018, Sessions referred the BIA’s decision to himself – a controversial practice that gives a political appointee, and the head of a law enforcement agency, absolute power to overturn the decision of an independent and neutral tribunal of administrative judges.  Sessions’s decision yesterday, which comes as a surprise to no one, vacates the BIA’s grant of asylum as “wrongly decided” and says:  “The mere fact that a country may have problems effectively policing certain crimes—such as domestic violence or gang violence—or that certain populations are more likely to be victims of crime, cannot itself establish an asylum claim.”

Calling it “an affront to the rule of law,” a group of 15 former immigration and BIA judges said Sessions’s finding erased “a 15-year process through the immigration courts and BIA” to develop nuanced and reliable legal standards on the “particular social group” basis for asylum.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that because the conditions in Nepal no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the designation set to expire on July 24, 2018, will now terminate on June 24, 2019.  TPS allows qualifying persons inside the United States to remain and work lawfully in the United States until conditions in their home countries improve following civil war, natural disaster or similar extraordinary situations.  The final year of designation gives those unable to acquire another legal status time to prepare to depart the United States by the TPS termination date.

Continue Reading DHS Announces Final TPS Re-registration for Nepal

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that because the conditions in Honduras no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the designation set to expire on July 15, 2018, will terminate on January 5, 2020.  This conclusion is at odds with the State Department travel advisory, which says that travelers should reconsider travel to Honduras due to violent crime (murder, assault, rape, armed robbery, gang activity, etc.).  The travel advisory can be found here.

TPS allows qualifying persons inside the United States to remain and work lawfully until conditions in their home countries improve following civil war, natural disaster or similar extraordinary situations.  The final period of designation gives those unable to acquire another legal status time to prepare to depart the United States by the TPS termination date.

DHS has not yet provided details for nationals of Honduras holding TPS status to re-register to extend their status through the designation end date of January 5, 2020.   When those instructions are issued, the employment authorization documents held by qualifying individuals already set to expire on July 15, 2018, will likely be automatically extended for six months, providing applicants time to apply for new employment authorization documents valid through the termination date.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that because the conditions in El Salvador  no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the designation set to expire on March 9, 2018, will terminate on September 9, 2019.  This conclusion is at odds with the State Department travel advisory, which says that travelers should reconsider travel to El Salvador due to violent crime (murder, assault, rape, armed robbery, gang activity, etc.).  The travel advisory can be found here.

Continue Reading Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador to End

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced today that because the conditions in El Salvador no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the designation set to expire on March 9, 2018, will terminate in 18 months.  TPS allows qualifying persons inside the United States to remain and work lawfully in the United States until conditions in their home countries improve following civil war, natural disaster or similar extraordinary situations.  The final 18 months of designation gives those unable to acquire another legal status time to prepare to depart the United States by the TPS termination date.

USCIS will issue a notice in the Federal Register with the exact dates for re-registration and employment authorization document (EAD) renewal.  We expect that EADs set to expire on March 9, 2018, will be automatically extended for 6 months.  We will update this entry as soon as the Federal Register notice is released.

DHS announced that it is extending Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for nationals of Honduras who already hold TPS. TPS allows qualifying individuals to remain and work lawfully in the United States until conditions in their home countries improve.  The new extension allows qualifying individuals from Honduras to re-register for TPS by  February 3, 2018.  Employment authorization documents held by qualifying individuals who timely re-register are automatically extended through July 5, 2018 (the USCIS web page indicates July 4, but the Federal Register notices indicates July 5). Employers can rely on the Federal Register notice for I-9 employment verification and re-verification purposes, which can be found here.

TPS typically is extended in 18-month increments, but the Secretary has the discretion to extend TPS for shorter periods.  Because the Secretary did not make a determination on Honduras’ designation by the statutory deadline (November 6, 2017), the extension was automatically extended for 6 months.  While DHS can still extend TPS further for Hondurans, it seems unlikely since DHS is ending TPS for other countries.  If TPS for Hondurans is not extended further, those unable to acquire another legal status will need to prepare to depart the United States by July 5, 2018.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that because the conditions in Nicaragua no longer support its designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the designation set to expire on January 5, 2018, will now terminate on January 5, 2019.  TPS allows qualifying persons inside the United States to remain and work lawfully in the United States until conditions in their home countries improve following civil war, natural disaster or similar extraordinary situations.  The final year of designation gives those unable to acquire another legal status time to prepare to depart the United States by the TPS termination date.

Nationals of Nicaragua holding TPS status have until February 13, 2018, to re-register to extend their status through the designation end date of January 5, 2019.   Employment authorization documents held by qualifying individuals already set to expire on January 5, 2018, are automatically extended through March 6, 2018, providing applicants time to apply for new employment authorization documents valid through the termination date. Employers can rely on the Federal Register notice for I-9 employment verification and re-verification purposes, which can be found here.