Following reports that DHS rejected 4,000 timely-filed DACA renewal applications for being late due to USPS delays, DHS Secretary Elaine Dukes directed the USCIS to accept the applications, provided that the resubmissions include “individualized proof” that the applications were originally mailed in a timely matter and that the delivery delay was because of USPS error.  Secretary Dukes did not define what constitutes proof of timely filing; however, those who do not have such documentation can contact USPS to review their cases.  USPS will provide applicants with letters to submit to USCIS with the resubmissions, if appropriate.

USCIS also discovered that it rejected some timely-filed applications in error, and will reach out to those applicants to advise them to resubmit their applications.  Those not contacted by the USCIS who believe their applications were erroneously rejected may also resubmit their applications with proof that their applications were received timely at the designated filing location.

Despite earlier hints that the “Dreamers” – undocumented youth who were brought to the United States illegally or lost their status while they were underage – might be allowed to retain their work permits and reprieve from deportation, Attorney General Sessions announced today that the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will end on March 5, 2018.  The six-month lag time is intended to allow Congress to codify DACA-like provisions into law.

Continue Reading DACA Dreamers on Life Support

Donald Trump’s statements about the U.S. immigration system were a main feature of his presidential campaign. Now that he has been elected, many are questioning whether and how those statements might become actual policies. We have already begun fielding questions from clients asking how new policies, regulations and laws will affect their businesses, their employees, their families, and themselves.

Continue Reading What Businesses Can Expect from Trump’s Immigration Agenda