The Associated Press is reporting that US embassies and consulates around the globe have been instructed to limit the validity period of F-1 visas issued to Chinese graduate students studying in fields such as robotics, aviation and high-tech manufacturing. The new policy requires that visas issued to such students are only valid for one year, where Chinese students are normally issued visas valid for up to five years. The policy is reportedly taking effect on June 11, 2018. There are more than 300,000 Chinese citizens studying in the United States – nearly one-third of all international students.

According to the report, the policy also requires that some Chinese employees of certain US companies will also be subject to special clearances resulting in visa processing delays of up to several months. The US Department of Commerce maintains the list of targeted companies, which is not available to the public.

Who is affected and what should they do?

This policy affects Chinese citizens who are applying for visas at US embassies and consulates – specifically, graduate students in certain fields, and some employees of companies that have been targeted for scrutiny by the US Department of Commerce. In addition, any Chinese citizen applying for a visa, who studies or works in a field that the US government might consider sensitive to national security or the economy, should be attentive to this policy and its possible expansion in the coming months. These individuals may want to stay in close contact with their school or employer to discuss their concerns and plan accordingly.

Hunton Andrews Kurth typically does not post about topics that are not officially announced, and it is important to note that this information is based on a single news report by the Associated Press. We will continue to monitor this issue and share relevant and credible information as it becomes available.

As negotiations in Congress continue towards resolving the shutdown of the federal government, individuals and companies that interact with the various federal agencies that administer immigration programs are naturally wondering how they might be affected. US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) typically provides clear information about the impact of a government shutdown on its operations. For other agencies, we can only look to prior shutdowns in 2011 and 2013 to understand what to expect.

As a general matter, only “essential” employees will continue to work until funding is restored. The following is what we anticipate with respect to the various agencies Hunton & Williams deals with on behalf of our clients:

Continue Reading How Will the Government Shutdown Impact Immigration? It Depends on the Federal Agency and Program Involved

The U.S. Department of State has announced that, effective August 23, 2017, U.S. consular operations in Russia – Moscow, St. Petersburg, Yekaterinburg and Vladivostok – will suspend processing of all nonimmigrant visa (NIV) applications. This action is being taken due to recent personnel reductions the Russian government has mandated for the U.S. Mission in Russia. Immigrant Visas related to permanent residence may also be impacted.
Continue Reading U.S. Consular Posts in Russia Suspend Nonimmigrant Visa Processing